Americans throw away 25,000,000,000 Styrofoam coffee cups every year. http://ht.ly/2cvNY

 

Bad Print Choices. From Greenpeace: Wal-Mart and Kentucky Fried Chicken are fueling global warming and extinction by using/selling Indonesian pulp/paper. http://ht.ly/2brcp

 

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Americans use 2,500,000 plastic bottles every hour! Most of them are thrown away! http://ht.ly/2cvTE

 

This Coated sticker is made from a renewable resource:  Regenerated cellulose i.e., wood pulp, that is sustainably harvested, it is Made Carbon Neutral at the point of departure from the manufacturer.  It is compostable in ambient composters (backyard composts) as well as professional composters (which I have yet to see one) under ASTM6400.

This is the best stock we have found to date!  It’s perfect for food or beverage labels for companies with a conscience.

A new investigative report from Greenpeace, “How Sinar Mas is Pulping the Planet,” shows how major brands like Wal-Mart and Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC)are fueling global warming and pushing Sumatran tigers and orangutans towards the brink of extinction. These companies are using or selling paper made from Asia Pulp and Paper (APP), part of the notorious Sinar Mas group that is destroying Indonesia’s rainforests and carbon- rich peatlands.

The new Greenpeace investigation shows how two important rainforest areas on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, the Kerumutan peatforest and Bukit Tigapuluh Forest Landscape, are being destroyed by Sinar Mas. APP uses the logs from these rainforest areas to feed its Sumatran-based pulp mills, which export pulp and paper products worldwide.

Many companies are responding to evidence of Sinar Mas group’s destructive practices by canceling their contracts with the Indonesian palm oil and paper giant. Greenpeace is calling on the rest to follow suit.
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Date published: July 06, 2010
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Trading Cards

Farmer’s Market Trading Cards – tradiing cards of the farmers who bring produce to farmers market Printed with soy ink for UEPI.

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Courtesy of Ecologist http://ht.ly/27Pva   :
24th June, 2010
British companies accused of profiting from emissions trading scheme while consumers foot the bill
British companies are taking part in a complex carbon credits trading scheme that has created a lucrative and inefficient market for the destruction of a potent greenhouse gas.
The Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) has criticised Barclays Bank, Royal Bank of Scotland and British Gas of colluding with a number of Chinese and Indian chemical companies in financing the destruction of HFC-23.
HFC-23 is a greenhouse gas around 11,700 more potent than carbon dioxide and is produced as a by-product of the creation of the commonly used refrigerant gas HCFC-22.
Barclays and RBS are alleged to be providing financial backing to mainly Indian and Chinese chemical companies who are able to destroy the gas for as little as €0.17 per tonne of carbon dioxide-equivalent before selling emissions grants on the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) for as much as €12.
British Gas is accused of purchasing these emissions credits at inflated prices and passing the costs onto their customers.
EIA campaigner Fionnuala Walravens said HFC-23 should be removed from any trading schemes and dealt with separately.
‘These companies are paying a lot of money for these credits and what we are arguing is that in this specific case of HFC-23 that is very cheap to destroy, it doesn’t make any sense to have it in the carbon market.’
Both Barclays and Royal Bank of Scotland declined to comment on their involvement in HFC-23 credit trading. Centrica, the parent company of British Gas, said it had only ‘limited involvement’ in the projects.
The World Development Movement (WDM) said that despite their public silence on the issue, companies were known to be lobbying in favour of keeping the trading scheme.
‘The rules should prevent this dodgy carbon trading from happening but it’s corporate lobbying from banks that are very interested in the lucrative business of trading carbon credits and British and European industrial companies which have lobbied in order to be able to keep emitting while paying for these offsets,’ said policy officer Tim Jones.
EIA say an amendment to remove HFC-23 from trading schemes was proposed at a recent summit but is likely to be opposed by India and China.

Barclays Bank, British Gas and RBS implicated in ‘scandalous’ carbon trading scheme Courtesy of Ecologist http://ht.ly/27Pva   for full text go here:24th June, 2010
British companies accused of profiting from emissions trading scheme while consumers foot the bill
British companies are taking part in a complex carbon credits trading scheme that has created a lucrative and inefficient market for the destruction of a potent greenhouse gas.
The Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) has criticised Barclays Bank, Royal Bank of Scotland and British Gas of colluding with a number of Chinese and Indian chemical companies in financing the destruction of HFC-23.
HFC-23 is a greenhouse gas around 11,700 more potent than carbon dioxide and is produced as a by-product of the creation of the commonly used refrigerant gas HCFC-22.
Barclays and RBS are alleged to be providing financial backing to mainly Indian and Chinese chemical companies who are able to destroy the gas for as little as €0.17 per tonne of carbon dioxide-equivalent before selling emissions grants on the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) for as much as €12.
British Gas is accused of purchasing these emissions credits at inflated prices and passing the costs onto their customers.
EIA campaigner Fionnuala Walravens said HFC-23 should be removed from any trading schemes and dealt with separately.  ‘These companies are paying a lot of money for these credits and what we are arguing is that in this specific case of HFC-23 that is very cheap to destroy, it doesn’t make any sense to have it in the carbon market.’ Both Barclays and Royal Bank of Scotland declined to comment on their involvement in HFC-23 credit trading. Centrica, the parent company of British Gas, said it had only ‘limited involvement’ in the projects. The World Development Movement (WDM) said that despite their public silence on the issue, companies were known to be lobbying in favour of keeping the trading scheme.
‘The rules should prevent this dodgy carbon trading from happening but it’s corporate lobbying from banks that are very interested in the lucrative business of trading carbon credits and British and European industrial companies which have lobbied in order to be able to keep emitting while paying for these offsets,’ said policy officer Tim Jones.
EIA say an amendment to remove HFC-23 from trading schemes was proposed at a recent summit but is likely to be opposed by India and China.

 
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